Featured Articles

Stopping Prison—and Jail—Privatization

Nov 24th, 2014 | By
Stopping Prison—and Jail—Privatization

Texas Jail Project supports all efforts to reduce the number of privatized county jails and prisons in Texas. We work with Grassroots Leadership to supply information and to educate lawmakers and county officials about the detrimental effects of this commercialization of our justice system, but it’s an uphill battle in Texas, which leads the nation in the number of detention facilities that are privatized. Now, GEO and CCA and the other money-hungry private companies are pulling in millions off the backs of immigrants. This excellent article from the American Friends Service Committee tells what it’s like for the people held in those places and follows the money as well: “”Immigrant detention is a growth opportunity for for-profit prison companies, expanding their business model from state and federal prisons.”



Helping families help a loved one in jail

Oct 15th, 2014 | By
Helping families help a loved one in jail

In late October, a “North Texas aunt” emailed Texas Jail Project about our ongoing efforts to help her nephew who was neglected in a county jail. She wrote: “I appreciate all of your efforts more than words can express. My nephew was moved to a new facility which has more medical available and is receiving all of his medication now. They also have given him something to help support his injury. I think that your efforts made them see that there were people watching and people who cared about this particular inmate. It is the only explanation as to why he started getting medical and MHMR treatment when there are stories of so many who do not. ”
The following article describes the struggle of another Texan to get help for a son, during his painful journey through Texas’ mental health and prison systems.



Pregnant in a Texas County Jail?

Jan 1st, 2013 | By
Pregnant in a Texas County Jail?

About 500 pregnant women are incarcerated in Texas county jails each month. Some are only held there a few days, but others may be incarcerated for weeks and months and a number will deliver their babies in local hospitals while in custody.