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TJP launches Cobos Award!

Sep 25th, 2020

Texas Jail Project is proud to announce the first-ever Cobos Award, to be presented annually to an individual in public service who demonstrates a commitment to the law and to the wellbeing of the community—and who does not hesitate to take action when witnessing something that is “just not right.”
The award is named for David M. Cobos, born and raised in El Paso County and a Midland justice of the peace and magistrate since 1997.
On a date to be announced, TJP will present Judge Cobos with the first Cobos Award, an engraved flashlight—a symbolic reminder of how important it is to shine a light into all corners of local government and public service, to ensure health, justice and peace in Texas communities.
Our choice of Judge Cobos arose from an action he took in 2019 when he had questions about the death of Christopher DuBoise at the Midland County Hospital.



Leadership transitions at TJP!

Aug 10th, 2020

Co-founder Krish Gundu transitioned into the role of executive director this month, and Dalila Reynoso has joined us as community advocate and organizer! Krish Gundu has been a part of Texas Jail Project since co-founding it with three other women in 2006, and Dalila Reynoso, who has extensive experience advocating for immigrant rights in Smith County, Texas, is now working in all areas of justice advocacy in that part of Texas. Longtime director Diana Claitor is continuing to work at TJP as Communications Director.



URGENT: CHANGE OF ADDRESS FOR OUR MAIL

Jun 16th, 2020

As of now, please send all mail to:
Texas Jail Project
13121 Louetta Road #1330
Cypress TX 77429



How is Texas Jail Project helping during the COVID-19 crisis?

Apr 23rd, 2020
Detainees wearing face masks

WE LISTEN AND CONNECT …
Families with resources and contacts: People in Dallas, Houston, Tyler, Victoria, San Antonio, Texarkana, and other towns are desperate for information about how county jails are protecting their loved ones from the virus. Remember, no visitors are allowed now since COVID-19! Also, no chaplains or educators or volunteers.



Why is it important to differentiate between county jails & prisons?

Apr 18th, 2020

You’re watching the news, and the reporter solemnly states, “William Larcenous will be spending the rest of his life in jail.” Or describes Mary Doe languishing in prison waiting for trial. But neither is true—because jails and prisons are very different kinds of facilities and the people in them are there for different reasons! Using the word “jail” correctly is especially important for public awarenessof of the large percentage of people being held pretrial—not yet convicted—in their local jails.



People Bring Powerful Stories to our Racial Equity Workshop

Dec 30th, 2019

Do you know anyone who feels like the color of their skin made it harder for them to get services or find a job or get legal help? Maybe you yourself have felt the effects of racial bias when trying to get mental health care or when defending yourself in the criminal justice system. Other people of color know what it’s like to be disrespected becuase of their sexual orientation or because of not speaking English. We recorded those story at our workshop in Dallas, Saturday, January 18th! The turnout was great and the videos are awesome. It will take more time to get them edited, and so please stay tuned!



Summer 2019 Newsletter

Aug 27th, 2019
70 Million podcast

Texas Jail Project is the focus of two episodes of 70 Million, a national documentary podcast about criminal justice reform. New York journalist and radio producer Rowan Moore Gerety has followed the work of Texas Jail Project for years, and he saw the potential of our history and advocacy for this acclaimed series. The first



Chaplain Describes Jails’ Treatment of Families

Aug 8th, 2018

Deacon Bob spoke truth to the Commissioners and staff at the quarterly meeting of the Jail Commission. One of his important points: “It appears that the sheriff and local staff have little concern for families of those incarcerated and the important role they play. These sheriffs seem to forget they are elected by those in their community, who may have a loved one in their jail. I hear it said many times by families that feel like they are being treated as though they have committed a crime, as well. I realize that public safety is top priority for the county jails, but families can and should be treated with respect. Each of us were created in God’s image and likeness.”



Maria Anna invites you to Jailhouse Stories

May 5th, 2018

Maria Ana speaks about her son’s experience of being held pretrial in a Texas county jail for 3 years and asks others to tell their stories.



Jail Reads Sends Books

Apr 18th, 2018

County jails are not required to have a library like state prisons are. And a lot of small to medium sized jails don’t have any books and only allow ones ordered from publishers or Amazon. So If your family can’t afford to buy them for you, you may go months with nothing to read or learn. Or you may only find tattered romance novels like our founder Diane Wilson found in the Victoria County Jail. So Jail Reads helps bring words and hope into the jails!