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Posts Tagged ‘ mental illness ’

Interview with a Peer in a Texas County Jail

Oct 1st, 2019

Until recently, Carolina was working with incarcerated people experiencing mental illness, providing information about resources they could use once out: housing, jobs and medical care. But she learned that first she had to overcome their distrust and fear. And some of them were very anxious—wondering if they will fail again once they are back in the free world.



CRIMEWATCH: Mental Health and Jails

Aug 24th, 2019
Fox News 7 interview with Texas Jail Project Executive Director Diana Claitor

An increasing number of the people held in our county jails are people living with mental illness or disabilities. Fox News 7 interviews Texas Jail Project Executive Director Diana Claitor about her thoughts on the problem.



Maria Anna invites you to Jailhouse Stories

May 5th, 2018

Maria Ana speaks about her son’s experience of being held pretrial in a Texas county jail for 3 years and asks others to tell their stories.



Voices of Pretrial Detention in Texas

Aug 22nd, 2016

“Sharing my story might not make it more safe for myself, but I would like to make it safe for someone else.” says John Brown, who was jailed at Dallas County Jail for two and a half years while awaiting trial. His and other stories reveal what happens to unconvicted people held in jails, mostly because they cannot afford the bail—a practice outlawed in many developed nations.
Last year, Texas Jail Project launched a website, “Jailhouse Stories: Voices from Pretrial Detention in Texas.” Collected over a two-year period, these powerful stories document a pattern of mistreatment and poor conditions experienced by those incarcerated in county jails while pretrial—innocent in the eyes of the law and awaiting their day in court.



Lawsuit Reveals Shocking Abuse in Victoria County Jail

Jun 7th, 2016

We tend to think that there is someone holding jails accountable for how they treat people with mental disorders, but this new lawsuit by the watchdog group, Texas Disability Rights, proves that terrible things are still happening and that jails have to be sued to make any changes. Since this lawsuit was filed in June, Texas Jail Project has received more complaints about Victoria County Jail, including one from a mother of a man who has mental disabilitiies and a serious phyical illness that is not being treated. When will the Texas Commission on Jail Standards take action to transform this sick jail?



RIP Greg Cheek: One of Us

May 25th, 2016
Greg Cheek

From his wife and the mother of his little girl: “Miss and love ya! Greg was a good friend, a loving father, a talented surfer, painter, and had a heart of gold. My husband battled mental health issues and as we all know Texas cut the budget for mental health a huge amount…”



Austin: New Sheriff Should Support Inmate Programs

Feb 27th, 2016
Travis County Jail inmate participate in a beekeeping class in 2014.

County commissioners and law enforcement across Texas often talk a good game about reducing recidivism and diverting people with mental illness. However, at the same time, many officials—and the jailhouse culture—erect barriers to programming that could help inmates while they are incarcerated. Romy Zarate says such programs can turn a life around.



How to help a person with mental illness who has been arrested

Oct 9th, 2015

Having a loved one arrested who has mental health issues is a scary and overwhelming situation. Family members are often forced to become advocates, to ensure their loved ones get the proper mental health screening, medications, and treatment. They can make an important difference in how the person in jail is treated.

Here is list of first steps to take to advocate for your loved one’s safety and health.



When a loved one with mental disorders is arrested

Oct 1st, 2015

If your loved one has a mental health diagnosis and is arrested, it can be helpful to fax a letter to the county jail and request that your loved one be screened for placement in a mental health unit. (Or you can deliver your letter in person to the jail.) Here are instructions for what information



A Caldwell County Mother Remembers

Aug 3rd, 2015

When Brenda Martin recalls how her only child’s life came to an end at the age of 37, she knows there was not one isolated event that caused his early demise. But she’s convinced that although he didn’t die in custody, the 73 days he spent in Caldwell County jail directly contributed to his death.