Four Suicides in Bexar Jail in Three Weeks

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Four Suicides in Bexar Jail in Three Weeks

Bexar County has received accolades for its reformed mental health care system, especially in terms of screening and pretrial services to divert people with mental disorders away from the county jail. That is well and good, but each time we’ve looked at the situation, two things come to light: a. only a small percentage of people with disorders are diverted and b. people actually held there are often neglected or not cared for properly. Whether or not these four individuals were ill, something is wrong when so many people manage to end their lives in such a short period. Texas Jail Project hopes the families of these individuals are treated with some respect and get some answers to their questions.

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August 4th: the next meeting of the Jail Commission August 4th: the next meeting of the Jail Commission

Each meeting starts at 9 am, and anyone can attend! You can speak during public input, which is at the very beginning, but the commissioners and staffers pay attention but do not respond. They will allow public speakers about 3 minutes. (You can also give them a letter.) Meetings occur in Austin every 3 months,on the first Thursday of that month. Continue for more info about the meetings of the Texas Commission on Jail Standards.

Austin: New Sheriff Should Support Inmate Programs Austin: New Sheriff Should Support Inmate Programs

County commissioners and law enforcement across Texas often talk a good game about reducing recidivism and diverting people with mental illness. However, at the same time, many officials—and the jailhouse culture—erect barriers to programming that could help inmates while they are incarcerated. Romy Zarate says such programs can turn a life around. “I was probably in the county jail about four times. Without the programming, I was in and out,” says Zarate. “When I was in, I was planning where I would score when I got out; after the programming, I stayed out.”

Next Jail Commission Meeting: May 5th Next Jail Commission Meeting: May 5th

Each meeting starts at 9 am, and anyone can attend! You can speak during public input, which is at the very beginning, but the commissioners and staffers will simply listen and will not respond to you at that time. They will allow public speakers about 9 am; limit your remarks to 3 minutes. (You can also give them a letter.) Meetings occur in Austin every 3 months,on the first Thursday of that month. Continue for a link that with more info about meetings of the Texas Commission on Jail Standards.

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Pretrial Detention

Voices of Texans in Pretrial Detention: “Jailhouse Stories” Voices of Texans in Pretrial Detention: “Jailhouse Stories”

“Sharing my story might not make it more safe for myself, but I would like to make it safe for someone else. Hopefully, the cycle will be broken one day,” says John Brown, a contributor to Jailhouse Stories who was jailed at Dallas County Jail for two and a half years while waiting for a trial.

This week, a new website, “Jailhouse Stories: Voices from Pretrial Detention in Texas,” was released by Texas Jail Project. Collected over a two-year period, these powerful stories document a pattern of mistreatment and poor conditions experienced by those incarcerated in county jails while pretrial—innocent in the eyes of the law and awaiting their day in court.

Families Speak Out

I found your website….and I am profoundly grateful. I found your website….and I am profoundly grateful.

July, 2016: “I found your website today, searching on behalf of a loved one who is incarcerated on a nonviolent drug offense and who has been in “administrative segregation” for going on 5 weeks now “for his protection” (he has been in isolation the entire time he’s been incarcerated, has untreated mental health issues, and has caused zero problems to the jail).  I wanted to let you know that I am profoundly grateful for the work that your organization does on behalf of one of our most vulnerable and neglected populations.