Texas Jail Project’s House Concert is almost here! Thurs. Nov. 13th

Lead Article

Texas Jail Project’s House Concert is almost here! Thurs. Nov. 13th

Please join us for an evening of food, drinks, fun, and the music of Gina Chavez! And we have Sarah Eckhardt, now our new Travis County Judge, speaking about conditions in county jails and the importance of TJP’s work—all at the lovely historic home of Ginny Agnew and Chuck Herring, known for progressive leadership, poetry, politics, and great parties.
Thursday, November 13th, 7 pm to 10 pm
1204 Castle Hill Street, in Clarksville, Austin
Continue to the next page for reasons why it’s important to buy a ticket and a link to the page where you can buy them!

Who We Are and What We Do

The Texas Jail Project seeks to improve the conditions for approximately 65,000 people—mothers, fathers, brothers, sons, sisters, and daughters—who are incarcerated in Texas county jails.
Our issue areas include:
  • Women and Pregnant Women in County Jails: This ongoing initiative works to monitor conditions for pregnant inmates, including their medical and dietary needs, in accordance with HB 3654, and to ensure that they are not shackled during childbirth or postpartum, in accordance with HB 3653.
  • Deadly Jails of Texas: This research and reporting project monitors deaths in custody at county jails in Texas, where more people die each month than die from execution in a year, e.g. 255 deaths in the past 4 years. About 1/3 are due to suicide and many result from medical neglect and untreated withdrawal. Special Populations: This program examines best practices with regard to other populations likely to be housed in county jails, including persons with mental illness, substance abusers, homeless people, veterans, and undocumented immigrants.
  • Stop Privatizing County Jails (SPCJ) Through this initiative, TJP works with other groups and the Texas Commission on Jail Standards to publicize the negative impact of privatization and directly help individuals with family members suffering in facilities run by private companies.
  • Featured Articles

    Helping families help a loved one in jail Helping families help a loved one in jail

    In late Octover, a “North Texas aunt” emailed Texas Jail Project about our ongoing efforts to help her nephew who was neglected in a county jail. She wrote: “I appreciate all of your efforts more than words can express. My nephew was moved to a new facility which has more medical available and is receiving all of his medication now. They also have given him something to help support his injury. I think that your efforts made them see that there were people watching and people who cared about this particular inmate. It is the only explanation as to why he started getting medical and MHMR treatment when there are stories of so many who do not. ”
    The following article describes the struggle of another Texan to get help for a son, during his painful journey through Texas’ mental health and prison systems.

    Neglect of people in jail can kill Neglect of people in jail can kill

    The numbers of people dying in county jails are adding up in 2014. On October 6th, 37-year-old Iretha Lilly died hours after being tased by a McLennan County deputy; because of many reports to us of jailers failing to respond to a person in a medical crisis, we are asking how long was Ms. Lilly in heart failure before she was taken to the ER? In September saw the tragic death of 18-year-old Victoria Gray in the Brazoria County Jail, after that jail failed to protect her despite knowing of her history. Both of them were pretrial—not yet convicted. (Our list is only of deaths within county jails, not police custody.) Earlier this year, when Courtney Ruth Elmore died in the Brown County Jail, was staff properly trained to watch for respiratory failure? David Grimaldo, 18, a Perryton High School student died just hours after being booked into the Ochiltree County Jail. Sheriff Joe Hataway reported that the teen died of a medical condition—could a quicker response have prevented his death?

    Pregnant in a Texas County Jail? Pregnant in a Texas County Jail?

    About 500 pregnant women are incarcerated in Texas county jails each month. Some are only held there a few days, but others may be incarcerated for weeks and months and a number will deliver their babies in local hospitals while in custody.

    Families Speak Out

    My son: a Marine veteran in solitary My son: a Marine veteran in solitary

    “My son Adan is in solitary confinement. Why? Because the jail considers that is the “safest” way to hold someone with a medical/mental condition. I was told that is for his good and the good of others. He does not have the opportunity to eat or mingle with other inmates. He has been in solitary confinement

    Jailhouse Stories

    Jailhouse Stories: Effects of Pretrial Detention Jailhouse Stories: Effects of Pretrial Detention

    Do you know that everyday Texans are losing jobs and being disconnected from their families while waiting for their cases to be processed?  They are the “innocent until proven guilty” and their numbers are astounding: 60% of the people in your average Texas county jail haven’t yet been convicted of anything, but are kept behind

    Women and Jails

    Texas county jails can do better than this Texas county jails can do better than this

    A woman cries out for help, but the correctional officers ignore her and she is forced to go through labor and give birth with no help. The infant dies. Other women have described similar scenarios to Texas Jail Project co-founders Diane Wilson and Diana Claitor, and we have posted a video of a woman describing how she gave birth alone in a cell–with a happier ending, since her baby lived. Click through to see that video and read more about Nicole Guerrero’s lawsuit against the Wichita Falls Jail.

    Conditions in County Jails

    National report matches our reports from Texas families National report matches our reports from Texas families

    The American Friends report to the UN describes the inhumanity of the U.S. justice system and the mistreatment of humans in our prisons and jails. Family members across Texas are reporting on similar conditions in many in our Texas county jails. Will Texas legislators step up and demand changes?
    “At the close of 2012, the U.S. led the world in incarceration rates1 with over 2.2 million adults held in prisons and jails. Why is this the case? Deeply flawed policies focusing on punishment − not healing or rehabilitation − have created a pipeline through which economically disadvantaged populations are funneled into prisons and jails. Incarcerated individuals are frequently exposed to deplorable, cruel, and dangerous conditions of confinement that no human being should experience.”

    Legal Issues & Jails

    Starting a Pretrial Intervention Program

    Once the initial charging decision is reached in a case, a prosecutor is concerned with the appropriate resolution. Experience tells us that cases can be broken down into four simple categories:
    • good people doing something stupid;
    • bad people doing something stupid;
    • good people doing something bad; and
    • bad people doing something bad.

    No categories